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Professor Jonathan Warner

Professor Jonathan Warner

Research Associate

Professor and Tutor in Economics, Quest University Canada


Biography:

Jonathan Warner holds a B.A. in PPE from Oxford University, a Ph.D. in welfare economics from the University of Wales, and a Post-Graduate Certificate in Education from Birmingham University. After completing his degrees, Jonathan taught at Maidstone Grammar School (England) for four years, moving on to North Cyprus in 1988 to teach at Eastern Mediterranean University. After ten years (with a year off at Nicholas Copernicus University, in Torun, Poland), he moved to Central Asia and taught for a year at the American University in Kyrgyzstan, before moving to Dordt College, in the scenic corn country of northwestern Iowa, U.S.A. He has also taught at the Russian-American Christian University in Moscow, and in the Creation Care Study Program in Belize.

Research Interests

Jonathan's research interests are in development economics, the role of religion in economics, and in scrip money (especially its use during the Great Depression). At the VHI he is working with Dr Flavio Comim on a project examining the relationship between Christianity and the Capability Approach, looking at both the insights that Catholic Social Teaching can bring to an understanding of what consitutes human flourishing, and how there insights can guide policy.

Key Publications

  • God and Martha Nussbaum, in Capabilities, Gender, Equality: toward fundamental entitlements (eds Martha Nussbaum and Flavio Comim) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014
  • Rights, Capabilities and Human Flourishing, in Christianity and Human Rights (ed. F. M. Shepherd) Rowman & Littlefield, 2009) pp. 163-176
  • Development, Capabilities, and Shalom, in Celebrating the Vision (ed. John H. Kok) Sioux Center: Dordt College Press, 2004 pp. 191-206


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